Looks may matter – but not in the way that you think

In a world where more people are undergoing plastic surgery than ever before and the cosmetics industry is worth billions of pounds, it’s clear people want to make themselves look good. But what does ‘good’ mean? And do looks matter?

Some people will say that looks don’t matter at all; some others will say that the ‘hard truth’ is that looks are the only thing that matters. Personally, I disagree with both statements:  in my opinion, looks matter but it is definitely not the only thing that matters – and that they don’t matter in the ways people think.

So what makes people want to change the way they look – to small and large extents? Do people want to look good for others or for themselves? I started wearing make-up every day when I was a teenager, but I only use eyeliner and a bit of foundation to make myself look a bit more awake in the morning. Others fill in brows or just put in mascara; some won’t be seen dead without a full face of make-up. There is a wide perception that everyone who wears make-up are doing so to look good for others – and of course this is true in many cases. Yet, there are also a significant number of people now who want to do this just to look good for themselves – not anyone else.

I’m certain people have been doing this for a long time, but this is a growing idea in modern society. Memes that show women dismissing guys when they make remarks such as ‘You’re wearing too much make-up’ or ‘You don’t need make-up’, and growing ideas of people being bold with – or without – make-up is becoming prevalent. This is good progress in society as it empowers people to do what they want with how they look.

There is, however, an ugly side to this too. More and more girls are being diagnosed with anorexia, growing trends such as thigh gaps and ridiculously small (and obviously photo shopped) waists. This costs confidence and far too often, lives. Much of the time, people end up at these extremes not because they want to look good for themselves but because society demands it; it is a toxic trend that should be addressed better by the cosmetic and clothing industries.

This leads me to my next point. Looking healthy contributes a great deal to looking good as well, as well as looking and feeling confident (see my article on confidence here). The more you appear confident in yourself and how you look, the more other people will perceive you in the same way; confidence is infectious, and there’s no reason why it shouldn’t be used as a tool to feeling good about the way you look.

I truly believe that beauty is in in the eye of the beholder; that is, different people find different things attractive or beautiful. Some people will scoff, but I think beauty is relative to different countries and a perception of beauty differs between every single person, however slight or great. What is conventionally attractive in India (fair skin) is not conventionally attractive in the West anymore (tanned skin). Even then, to say that every single person of India’s population 1.3 billion believes fair skin is attractive would be false.

I suppose there will always be those people that everyone just looks at and thinks “Wow.” But it’s important to think that it won’t be everyone who thinks that. What was conventionally beautiful fifty years ago may not be conventionally beautiful today; and what is beautiful today may not be another fifty years. From this, therefore, we can learn that we should learn to accept all types of beauty; if we can learn to say that looks matter without forcing a desired look upon society, then we can go forward.

 

 

 

One thought on “Looks may matter – but not in the way that you think

  1. Pingback: 8 weeks and counting: a reflection of my first two months at University | the vaiking blog

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